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zoomez pour lire l'histoire des bougies chirac des pièces jaunes

je tente aussi @OCRbot

le pire c'est que tu commences à lire, tu te dit mais enfin c'est pas possible, puis la photo de la bougie apparaît

OCR Output (chars: 2838) 

@Sapphaos
Abonnements

ia hedgehog-moss_ S'abonner
25 févr. 2020

Exactly 20 years ago (give or take a few days)
like most French schoolchildren I was given

a piggy bank to collect yellow coins (small
change). It was a charity campaign called
Opération Pieces Jaunes, to help hospitalised
children, but my classmates & I were quite
indifferent to the charity aspect because all
we cared about was the fact that our teacher
started giving us a candle in the shape of
President Jacques Chirac every time we
returned our little box filled with coins.

We were completely enraptured by those
candles and the way the president’s face would
start melting hideously if we let them burn
long enough. Without any kind of deliberation
among ourselves we turned it into a class-wide
contest—it was obvious to everyone that the
point of the Yellow Coins charity campaign
was to win many little Chiracs and melt them
to make the face of our president as freakishly
deformed as possible. We exchanged them for
pogs and marbles. We had recently learnt about
the Plague in history class, with great relish,
hence one lucky girl who managed to obtain

a particularly monstrous half-melted face

with a big wax bubble reminiscent of a bubo
sold it way above the going rate, for 12 galaxy
marbles—a fortune. (I was among the losers

of this auction, and commented in my diary,
with deep regret, “It’s just what it would look
like if the President had the bubonic plague!”)
Every day after school we went round town
begging passersby for coins with something
akin to mania in order to get more Chiracs to
burn into ever ghastlier shapes. An old lady we
ambushed in front of the church praised us
warmly for our charitable spirit.

Eventually our teacher ran out of candles

and this odd chapter of my childhood ended

as abruptly as it had started. Our class was
congratulated in front of the whole school for
being by far the most ardently devoted to the
cause (we got ~15kg of coins.) I wonder if the
principal asked our teacher what her secret was
to make us collect a truly astonishing amount of
coins compared to the other classes, and how
he reacted when she replied that she motivated
us with busts of the President. One teacher
gave a Carambar for a full box of coins, another
believed that helping sick children should be
incentive enough, but our teacher, an expert in
child psychology, was alone in her conviction
that the best way to go about this was to hand
out human wax effigies for her students to

burn.

[B, hedgehog-moss S'abonner
11 mars 2021

This post is now one year old and my favourite
thing about it is that no French person in the
notes has ever seen a Chirac candle before,
which strengthens my theory that my primary
school teacher was making them herself, at
home, as a hobby, and with this exact purpose
in mind.

@lulucybrelu à chaque fois que des gens ressortent ce post je suis morte de rire

@Sapphaos c'est pour ça qu'il est mort il s'est fait hex 50 fois par 30 enfants de 7 ans

@lulucybrelu prof sorcière qui fait des bougies maudites pour que les enfants récoltent des pièces

@Sapphaos ce post est dangereux quand on a le covid mon fou rire me fait mal aux muscles !!!

@Calico y a une nouvelle salve de rb je l'ai vu 5 fois depuis hier

OCR Output (chars: 2918) 

@lertsenem
(Couldn't find a language with the name 'je', falling back to eng.)

Abonnements

ia hedgehog-moss_ S'abonner
25 févr. 2020

Exactly 20 years ago (give or take a few days)
like most French schoolchildren I was given

a piggy bank to collect yellow coins (small
change). It was a charity campaign called
Opération Pieces Jaunes, to help hospitalised
children, but my classmates & I were quite
indifferent to the charity aspect because all
we cared about was the fact that our teacher
started giving us a candle in the shape of
President Jacques Chirac every time we
returned our little box filled with coins.

We were completely enraptured by those
candles and the way the president’s face would
start melting hideously if we let them burn
long enough. Without any kind of deliberation
among ourselves we turned it into a class-wide
contest—it was obvious to everyone that the
point of the Yellow Coins charity campaign
was to win many little Chiracs and melt them
to make the face of our president as freakishly
deformed as possible. We exchanged them for
pogs and marbles. We had recently learnt about
the Plague in history class, with great relish,
hence one lucky girl who managed to obtain

a particularly monstrous half-melted face

with a big wax bubble reminiscent of a bubo
sold it way above the going rate, for 12 galaxy
marbles—a fortune. (I was among the losers

of this auction, and commented in my diary,
with deep regret, “It’s just what it would look
like if the President had the bubonic plague!”)
Every day after school we went round town
begging passersby for coins with something
akin to mania in order to get more Chiracs to
burn into ever ghastlier shapes. An old lady we
ambushed in front of the church praised us
warmly for our charitable spirit.

Eventually our teacher ran out of candles

and this odd chapter of my childhood ended

as abruptly as it had started. Our class was
congratulated in front of the whole school for
being by far the most ardently devoted to the
cause (we got ~15kg of coins.) I wonder if the
principal asked our teacher what her secret was
to make us collect a truly astonishing amount of
coins compared to the other classes, and how
he reacted when she replied that she motivated
us with busts of the President. One teacher
gave a Carambar for a full box of coins, another
believed that helping sick children should be
incentive enough, but our teacher, an expert in
child psychology, was alone in her conviction
that the best way to go about this was to hand
out human wax effigies for her students to

burn.

[B, hedgehog-moss S'abonner
11 mars 2021

This post is now one year old and my favourite
thing about it is that no French person in the
notes has ever seen a Chirac candle before,
which strengthens my theory that my primary
school teacher was making them herself, at
home, as a hobby, and with this exact purpose
in mind.

@Sapphaos une autre théorie c'est que quelqu'un dans sa famille lui a offert un cageot de bougies Chirac, qui sont restées deux ans dans sa cave avant qu'elle trouve quoi en faire

@Sapphaos mdrrr
je suis en train de rigoler toute seule au boulot jpp
j'espère que personne va me demander pourquoi

@Sapphaos ohlala mais quel fou rire, merci pour le partage !
(Et l'OCR Bot a bien fait son boulot)

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